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Publication of research data

There are a variety of ways to publish research data for reuse, whether in a data repository, a data journal, your own website, or appended to a journal article. There is a growing expectation among research funders and journals that data should be openly available in a data repository.

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Choosing a repository

There are several repositories where you can deposit and share your research data. Which repository is most suitable will depend on what funders, publishers, or journals require and the type of research data you have to deposit. There are both general and discipline-specific repositories. If there is a recognised resource specific to your field it is usually the best alternative.

Finding repositories

Re3data, the Registry of Research Data Repositories, lists online services in a range of disciplines. Science Europe’s criteria for choosing a repository are useful if there is no community-recognised disciplinary repository for your field.

Search and find in the Registry of Research Data Repositories – re3data.org

Science Europe guide to research data management and selecting a repository – scienceeurope.org

Persistent identifiers, documentation, and metadata

Any credible repository will assign your research data a persistent identifier such as a DOI (digital object identifier) and will require you to deposit data with documentation and metadata. Repositories have different metadata requirements – for example, different metadata standards – which should be borne in mind when starting a research project.

Examples of general or interdisciplinary repositories

The links below lead to the repositories own websites.

Lund University has its own service, DataGURU, for sharing environmental and climate data, and in future will have a repository for datasets from MAX IV Laboratory.

Lund University's service DataGURU – dataguru.lu.se

MAX IV DataStaMP data storage and management – maxiv.se

Contact the Library of Science for help

If you are unsure which repository to choose, the Library of Science offers research support.

Anja Ödman

Specialist librarian in research support at the Biology Library and Geolibrary.
Email: anja [dot] odman [at] science [dot] lu [dot] se
Phone: +46 76-139 17 01

Kurt Mattsson

Specialist librarian in research support at the Astronomy Library, the Physics Library, and the Library of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering.
Email: kurt [dot] mattsson [at] science [dot] lu [dot] se
Phone: +46 79-063 08 23

Safeguarded and controlled data

Not all research data should be freely available. Sharing may be limited because it contains personal or otherwise sensitive data, confidential data, or copyrighted material. Where research data is generated by researchers at two or more universities, a research contract setting out access should be agreed in advance.

Guidelines on the registration of personal data processing for research on the Staff Pages

Templates for research contracts and other agreements on the Staff Pages